CROP Walk is Approaching!

CROP WalkCrop Walk 2015 is fast approaching. So far Chip, Gregory and Carolyn have signed up to be walkers. We hope more of you will join us on Sunday, Oct. 4. Just a reminder that Walkers need to register online- see full details here.

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Crop Hunger Walk October 4

CROP WalkThe Crop Walk is on Sunday, October 4, with registration beginning at 1 and the walk beginning at 2 PM. It is being held at Burgess Park in Menlo Park.

The purpose is to raise money to fight hunger. Three fourths of the money raised goes to Church World Service.  The remaining fourth goes to two local organizations that work with needy people in our area, namely the Ecumenical Hunger Project and Call Primrose in Burlingame.

In addition to walking, there will be food, an auction, a couple of bands, and a chance to meet like-minded people. Faith groups from Los Altos to Burlingame will be participating.

Click here for  instructions for all of our walkers and for anyone who may wish to donate to our team online.

Carolyn Shepard

650-595-5635

CROP Hunger Walk October 4

CROP WalkFrom Carolyn Shepard-

Do you enjoy walking? Come join me and walk for a purpose on Sunday, Oct. 4 at 1:00 p.m. We meet at Burgess Park in Menlo Park for a one-mile walk, three-mile walk, or a five-mile run through a nice residential district.

The purpose is to raise money to fight hunger. Three fourths of the money raised goes to Church World Service. The remaining fourth goes to two local organizations that work with needy people in our area, namely the Ecumenical Hunger Project and Call Primrose in Burlingame.

To find out more about CROP walks and Church World Service you can go to their web site, www.churchworldservice.org . Or find out more about the San Francisco Peninsula CROP Walk.

In addition to walking, there will be food, an auction, a couple of bands, and a chance to meet like-minded people. Faith groups from Los Altos to Burlingame will be participating.

Contact me if you are interested in joining our team and I will give you a donation form to start collecting donations. Or, you can e-mail me, J092048@aol.com if you want to participate.

− Carolyn Shepard

From Bread for the World

I recently traveled to East Africa to learn how international development policies in Washington, D.C., such as Feed the Future, impact and improve people’s lives on the ground in Uganda and Tanzania.

A powerful takeaway from the trip is that women are truly the chief agents the world relies on to fight hunger. But we need more women to be empowered.

That’s the message of our 2015 Hunger Report. And in celebration of Women’s History Month, we’ve launched a new video that explains why –

Almost 60 percent of the world’s 805 million chronically malnourished people are women and girls. But if they are among the most vulnerable to hunger, they are also the best solution to the problem of hunger. The majority of the dramatic reduction in child malnutrition made in the developing world over the past few decades is due to improvements in the status of women. For instance, providing girls with just one extra year of schooling can increase individual wages by up to 20 percent.

Supporting Feed the Future can also empower women. It is a proven development program that can help the United States invest in women in agriculture worldwide. Contact your members of Congress and urge them to support upcoming Feed the Future legislation to improve global food security and better combat chronic hunger and malnutrition.

Sincerely,

Beth Ann Saracco
Policy Analyst, Bread for the World

P.S. Visit HungerReport.org to read the full report and explore interactive data tools that explain the crucial role of women in ending hunger.

Raising Lazarus

Raising of LazarusIn Adult Spiritual Formation this Sunday we will continue our consideration of hunger as a Lenten concern. If you have had experiences of dealing with hunger and the hungry over the past few weeks, please be ready to share those. We will also consider some common “experiment” around hunger (a la Mark Scandrette) in which we might engage as a congregation.

Once more in worship we will be instructed by one of those wonderful stories from the gospel of John. This week it’s the raising of Lazarus in which we encounter the deep and abiding faith of Martha and Mary. Here Jesus affirms that he himself is the Resurrection and the Life and then breaks down and weeps in front of his dead friend’s burial place. Even with the power to raise Lazarus from the dead, the pain of death still touches the heart of a very human Jesus. This is the last and greatest of the “signs” recounted in John’s gospel. It becomes the tipping point for those religious authorities who fear Jesus’ threat to their power. It leads rather directly to Christ’s crucifixion. The end is in sight or is it?

See you Sunday at 10 AM for worship (with Communion) and Sunday School. Bring someone along to share the Lenten Journey with you and stay for Adult Spiritual Formation.

God grant us more light, more love, more life as we journey together.

Pastor Rick

Lent & Hunger

Norman Borlaug
Norman Borlaug

This Sunday we will resume our consideration of hunger as a Lenten concern. If you have had some experiences of dealing with hunger and the hungry over the past few weeks, please be ready to share those in Adult Spiritual Formation on Sunday. On the Bread for the World blog you can find a tribute to a remarkable man named Norman Borlaug who devoted his life to issues of hunger. I am grateful to Hugh Satterlee who first introduced me to the work of this remarkable man. We may not be able to accomplish what he did in a lifetime but we can surely do our part. By the way, if you notice a strange odor around the campus, we engaged in a ritual of “burning bread” at last Friday’s potluck. If you’re wondering, ask Hugh. It relates to our hunger emphasis.

In worship we will spend time immersed in another of those remarkable stories from the gospel in which Jesus encounters an unlikely character and proceeds to unfold the gospel before them. This week it is “The Woman at the Well.” A Samaritan woman in conversation with a Jewish rabbi – unheard of! And yet the encounter breaks barriers and saves lives. Perhaps we might have some of that “living water” that transforms life.

See you Sunday at 10 AM for worship and Sunday School. Bring someone along to share the Lenten Journey with you and stay for Adult Spiritual Formation.

God grant us more light, more love, more life as we journey together.
Pastor Rick